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Parent Resources

information and resources available to SPH parents

The Facts

Children who are read to at home have a higher success rate in school.

According to the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), a division of the U.S. Department of Education, children who are read to at home enjoy a substantial advantage over children who are not:

  • Twenty-six percent of children who were read to three or four times in the last week by a family member recognized all letters of the alphabet. This is compared to 14 percent of children who were read to less frequently.
  • The NCES1 also reported that children who were read to frequently are also more likely to:
    • count to 20, or higher than those who were not (60% vs. 44%)
    • write their own names (54% vs. 40%)
    • read or pretend to read (77% vs. 57%)
  • According to NCES2, only 53 percent of children ages three to five were read to daily by a family member (1999). Children in families with incomes below the poverty line are less likely to be read to aloud everyday than are children in families with incomes at or above poverty.
  • The more types of reading materials there are in the home, the higher students are in reading proficiency, according to the Educational Testing Service.3
  • The Educational Testing Services reported that students who do more reading at home are better readers and have higher math scores; however, students read less for fun as they get older.

Taken from "Facts about Children's Literacy." National Education Association, www.nea.org/grants/facts-about-childrens-literacy.html

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