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Images and Art

Academic Honesty

Part of academic honesty is: 
acknowledging that you have used other people's ideas, research and creativity in creating your own work.

  Remember: Citing an image is just as important as citing any other works that you use in your own work.

  • If you don't acknowledge someone's work, there is an assumption that whatever is included in your work is your own. 
  • Using another person's ideas, research or creativity without acknowledging them is called plagiarism.

 

According to the IB

Proper citation is a key element in academic scholarship and intellectual exchange. When we cite we:

  • show respect for the work of others
  • help a reader to distinguish our work from the work of others who have contributed to our work
  • give the reader the opportunity to check the validity of our use of other people’s work
  • give the reader the opportunity to follow up our references, out of interest
  • show and receive proper credit for our research process
  • demonstrate that we are able to use reliable sources and critically assess them to support our work
  • establish the credibility and authority of our knowledge and ideas
  • demonstrate that we are able to draw our own conclusions
  • share the blame (if we get it wrong)

from p. 2 of "Effective Citing and Referencing."  International Baccalaureate Organization, Aug. 2014, www.ibo.org/globalassets/digital-tookit/brochures/effective-citing-and-referencing-en.pdf.

How do I Cite Images in MLA

based on MLA Style, 8th edition

Locate the following information about the image:

  • Name of the creator 
  • Title of the digital image
    • If the digital image does not have a title, include a description of the image. Do not place this information in quotation marks or italics
  • Title of the website that the image was found on
  • Names of any other contributors responsible for the digital image
  • Version of the image (if applicable)
  • Any numbers associated with the image (if applicable)
  • Publisher of the image
  • Date the image was created or published
  • Location of the image, such as a URL
    • omit “http://” and “https://” from the site’s address
    • if found using Google Images, do not cite Google Images as the publisher. Instead, click on the picture and use the information from the website that is hosting the picture

Structure of Citation:

Creator(s). “Image Title.” Title of Website, Contributor(s), Version (if applicable), Number (if applicable), Publisher, Publication date, URL.

Examples:

Yanajin33. "A Bale Meten (Sleeping Pavilion) within a Balinese House Compound." Wikipedia, 29 Aug. 2013, en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Balinese_traditional_house#/media/File:Little_world,_Aichi_prefecture_-_Gentry_House_of_Bali_in_Indonesia.jpg.
 

TO INCLUDE AN IMAGE IN YOUR PAPER

Fig. 1. A photograph depicting a Balinese sleeping
pavilion (Yanajin33, "A Bale Meten").

FOR MORE ON IMAGES IN MLA, SEE: TABLES and ILLUSTRATIONS.

FOR OTHER REFERENCING STYLES SEE: SPH REFERENCING GUIDE

Information adapted from EasyBib http://www.easybib.com/guides/citation-guides/mla-8/cite-digital-image-mla-8/

Academic Honesty vs. Copyright

 Remember: Attribution is not the same as fair use.

Just because you have cited an image accurately does not automatically mean you have permission to use the image.

 

TO CHECK IF YOU CAN USE AN IMAGE SEE THE COPYRIGHT AND FAIR USE GUIDE.